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WELCOME TO

VALLEY EYECARE OPTOMETRY

We’re proud to offer comprehensive eye care services and eyewear for the whole family. Our staff looks forward to helping you with all of your eye health needs. We will take the time to answer all of your questions and ensure you understand all of your options.

If you are looking for an experienced optometrist and convenient, high-quality eye care, contact us today!

 

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Woman Putting in Eye Drops

Dry Eye

Dry eye syndrome is a condition in which the eye does not produce enough tears, or the tears are too thin to lubricate and nourish the eye. Tears are necessary for maintaining the health of the front surface of the eye and for providing clear vision. Dry eye syndrome is a common and often chronic problem, particularly in older adults.

Tears provide lubrication and reduce the risk of eye infection. They wash away foreign matter in the eye as well as keep the surface of the eye smooth and clear. With each blink of the eyelids, tears are spread across the front surface of the eye known as the cornea.

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Eye Exams

A comprehensive eye exam includes testing with eye charts that help the doctor determine the sharpness of your vision. We will check your visual acuity, or how well you are able to identify details. This is generally done with charts like the Snellen eye chart.

People usually recognize this test, though they may not know it by name. With an “E” at the top and eleven rows of capital letters, the Snellen chart helps the doctor determine your visual acuity. The fourth line from the bottom is “20/20” vision. This means you can see as well at 20 feet as someone with adequate visual acuity should. Some people can see even better than this, but 20/20 is the standard. It generally means you don’t need corrective lenses to drive or do other everyday activities.

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Pediatric Eye Exam
Closeup of the Eye

How Eyes Work

Vision begins when light rays are reflected off of an object and enters the eye through the cornea and then pupil. It then passes through the crystalline lens which refracts light to be focused on the retina. By changing shape, the lens functions to change the focal distance of the eye so it can focus on objects at various distances.

When light hits the retina, tiny cells, rods, and cones capture the light signals and convert them into electrochemical impulses in neurons. Rods communicate the object’s shape by reading black and white and shades of gray. Cones communicate the color of the object. Working together, the rods and cones process the light.

Learn More

Dry Eye

Dry eye syndrome is a condition in which the eye does not produce enough tears, or the tears are too thin to lubricate and nourish the eye. Tears are necessary for maintaining the health of the front surface of the eye and for providing clear vision. Dry eye syndrome is a common and often chronic problem, particularly in older adults.

Tears provide lubrication and reduce the risk of eye infection. They wash away foreign matter in the eye as well as keep the surface of the eye smooth and clear. With each blink of the eyelids, tears are spread across the front surface of the eye known as the cornea.

Learn More

Eye Exams

A comprehensive eye exam includes testing with eye charts that help the doctor determine the sharpness of your vision. We will check your visual acuity, or how well you are able to identify details. This is generally done with charts like the Snellen eye chart.

People usually recognize this test, though they may not know it by name. With an “E” at the top and eleven rows of capital letters, the Snellen chart helps the doctor determine your visual acuity. The fourth line from the bottom is “20/20” vision. This means you can see as well at 20 feet as someone with adequate visual acuity should. Some people can see even better than this, but 20/20 is the standard. It generally means you don’t need corrective lenses to drive or do other everyday activities.

Learn More

How Eyes Work

Vision begins when light rays are reflected off of an object and enters the eye through the cornea and then pupil. It then passes through the crystalline lens which refracts light to be focused on the retina. By changing shape, the lens functions to change the focal distance of the eye so it can focus on objects at various distances.

When light hits the retina, tiny cells, rods, and cones capture the light signals and convert them into electrochemical impulses in neurons. Rods communicate the object’s shape by reading black and white and shades of gray. Cones communicate the color of the object. Working together, the rods and cones process the light.

Learn More

Helpful Resources

Interactive Eye

Dry Eye Syndrome

Proper Lens Care Instructions

OCTA (Angiography)

Prokera (Biotissue)

Europa Scleral Lenses